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  • WWI -New German Offensive Maps -Illustrated London News 1918
    An Original Page (16" x 11 1/4") From the Illustrated London News of June 1st 1918 of maps showing the new German Offensives on Two Fronts. World War I, or THE GREAT WAR, was an extremely bloody war that engulfed Europe from 1914 to 1919, with huge losses of life and little ground lost or won. Fought mostly by soldiers in trenches, World War I saw an estimated 10 million military deaths and another 20 million wounded. While many hoped that World War I would be "the war to end all wars," in actuality, the concluding peace treaty set the stage for World War II. The 100 years centenary of World War One will be commemorated in 2014.
    NZ$ 15.00
  • Standard Oil CHEVRON California Travel Map 1964
    Fold out travel map in good condition
    NZ$ 17.00
  • PURE Firebird Gasoline Michigan Travel Map 1964
    Looks to be in excellent condition.
    NZ$ 31.00
  • Bartholomew's Plan Of London - Central Area - Circa 1928
    In booklet form it is 8 1/4" x 4 1/4" with the cloth backed Map folding out to 36 1/2" x 23". The booklet has slit into two parts. The map itself is in excellent condition as is the interior of the booklet. Dates to 1928. Great On The Wall!
    NZ$ 35.00
  • 1892
    In remarkable condition for a Pocket Edition Reference Guide this little booklet is just 6 3/4" x 4". The initial 16 page guide is detached from the cover but is very clean and tidy throughout. The large fold-out Map at back is also detached from the booklet and has some faults but again condition is very good for age.The Guide states Statistics for the year 1891 SO WE ARE ASSUMING PUBLICATION WAS THE YEAR FOLLOWING IN 1892.
    NZ$ 55.00
  • 1928 London General Omnibus Company No.4 Route Map
    In truly excellent condition for age this small fold-out Route Map measures 5 3/4" x 3 " folding out to 22.5" x 17.5" as pictured.
    NZ$ 55.00
  • French Foreign Legion Indochina War 1954-55 Map 'Chantaburi'
    This Map was prepared in 1944 and published/printed 1954 - 1955. A rare map of CHANTABURI - Thailand - Cambodia Border. On the reverse there is a MAP GRID LOCATOR covering entire - French Indochine - Indochina - LAOS, CAMBODIA, VIETNAM ( N and S ), - this is same grid locator as used by Viet Minh - Viet Cong. The map measures - 24 x 18 inches (60 x 45 cm's). In very good condition for age...some staining and one tear approx 2" long on border bottom right just below fold.
    NZ$ 65.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of COPENHAGEN Published By
    An Original Map of COPENHAGEN circa 1837 taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of GENEVA Circa 1841 Published By
    An Original Map of GENEVA circa 1841 Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of HAMBURG Published By
    An Original Map of HAMBURG Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of MARSEILLE Circa 1840 Published By
    An Original Map of STOCKHOLM Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of MOSCOW Published By
    An Original Map of MOSCOW circa 1836 taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of NAPLES circa 1835 Published By
    An Original Map of NAPLES taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of STOCKHOLM Circa 1836 Published By
    An Original Map of STOCKHOLM Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of St. PETERSBURG Circa 1834 Published By
    An Original Map of St. PETERSBURG Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of The Environs of DUBLIN Circa 1837 Published By
    An Original Map of DUBLIN taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • Original ATLAS MAP of Germany Circa 1840 Published By
    An Original Map of GERMANY Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • Original Map of The Environs of EDINBURGH Circa 1835 Published By
    An Original Map of EDINBURGH Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 100.00
  • An Original Atlas Map of TOULON circa 1840 Published By
    An Original Map of TOULON dated 1840 taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • Antique Map of ANTWERP - Dated 1832
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the 1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for ANTWERP is dated 1832 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • Antique Map of Birmingham - 1839
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for Birmingham City by J. Henshall is not dated but we find it dates to 1839 .... it measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • Antique Map of DRESDEN - Dated 1833
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for DRESDEN is dated 1833 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • Antique Map of FRANKFORT -Dated 1837
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the 1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for FRANFORT is dated 1837 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • Antique Map of GENOA - Dated 1834
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for GENOA is dated as 1834 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • Antique Map of Liverpool - Dated 1836
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for LIVERPOOL CITY is dated as Sept. 1836 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • Antique Map of MILAN - Dated 1832
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for MILAN is dated as 1832 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • Original Map of The United States - Pre 1845
    An original old 18 1/2" X 12 1/2" Map of the UNITED STATES........ in good condition for age ....minor 'spotting' only....piece missing at top right but would not affect it when framed-up. The map is pre the formation of TEXAS as a State which took place in 1845.
    NZ$ 105.00
  • 1830 MAP of The East Central Region of England - William IV Period
    This is a genuine old map produced by BALDWIN & CRADOCK of Paternoster Row, London, dated as September 1st 1830. The map is comprised of 8 paper segments with Linen Backing and is in good condition for its 179 years of age. It would be ideal for framing under glass.
    NZ$ 110.00
  • 1830 MAP of The South East of England - William IV Period
    This is a genuine old map produced by BALDWIN & CRADOCK of Paternoster Row, London, dated as June 15th 1830. The map is comprised of 8 paper segments with Linen Backing and is in good condition for its 179 years of age. It would be ideal for framing under glass
    NZ$ 110.00
  • 1830 MAP of The South West of England - William IV Period
    This is a genuine old map produced by BALDWIN & CRADOCK of Paternoster Row, London, dated as June 13th 1830. The map is comprised of 8 paper segments with Linen Backing and is in good condition for its 179 years of age. It would be ideal for framing under glass
    NZ$ 110.00
  • 1831 MAP of The North of England - William IV Period
    This is a genuine old map produced by BALDWIN & CRADOCK of Paternoster Row, London, dated as February 1st 1831. The map is comprised of 8 paper segments with Linen Backing and is in good condition for its 179 years of age. It would be ideal for framing under glass.
    NZ$ 110.00
  • 1831 MAP of The West Central Region of England - William IV Period
    This is a genuine old map produced by BALDWIN & CRADOCK of Paternoster Row, London, dated as April 1st 1831. The map is comprised of 8 paper segments with Linen Backing and is in good condition for its 179 years of age. It would be ideal for framing under glass.
    NZ$ 110.00
  • 1885 MAP
    An old engraved map Circa 1885 ...."Copied by Permission From The Plan of Sir Harry Jones G.C.B. BY GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & Co, Farringdon Street, London". The map is as pictured....in one piece but with wear to fold marks.....could be successfully taped from the back and framed. Size is 24 1/2" x 18 1/4"
    NZ$ 110.00
  • Antique Map of FLORENCE - Dated 1835
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for FLORENCE is dated 1835 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 110.00
  • Antique Map of France By The
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for FRANCE I is dated as 1830 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 110.00
  • Antique Map of PARMA - Dated 1840
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for PARMA is dated as 1840 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 110.00
  • Antique Map of TURIN - Dated 1833
    Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to mid 1840's. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. This map for TURIN is dated as 1833 and measures 16" x 13 1/2". General condition is good for age.The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 110.00
  • Two Original Atlas Maps of PARIS Circa 1834 Published By
    TWO Original Maps of PARIS circa 1834 Taken from an Atlas By The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" containing various Country and Ancient Maps all dated around the1830's to 1844. Maps may have blemishes but General condition is good for age.... please refer pictures. It appears that Baldwin & Cradock of London printed most of these the Maps. These maps measures 16 1/4" x 13 3/4".The "Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge" was a Whiggish organization founded in 1828 at the instigation of idealistic British lord Henry Peter Brougham. The admirable goal of the Society was to distribute useful information via a series of publications to the English working and middle classes. It promoted self-education and the egalitarian sharing of all knowledge. While closely tied to the London University and publishing houses on the order of Baldwin and Cradock, Chapman and Hall, and Charles Knight, the Society failed to achieve its many lofty goals in finally closed its doors in 1848. Most likely the failure of the Society resulted from its publications being too expensive for its intended lower to middle class markets and yet not large and fine enough to appeal to the aristocratic market. Nonetheless, it did manage to publish several extraordinary atlases of impressive detail and sophistication. Their most prominent atlas consisted of some 200 separately issued maps initially published by Baldwin and Cradock and sold by subscription from 1829 to 1844. Afterwards, the Society combined the maps into a single world atlas published under the Chapman and Hall imprint. In its day, this atlas was unprecedented in its quality, scope, and cost effectiveness. Today Society, or S.D.U.K. as it is commonly known, maps are among the most impressive examples of mid-19th century English mass market cartographic publishing available. The S.D.U.K. is especially known for its beautiful and accurately detailed city plans. Robert Baldwin and Cradock (early 19th Century) were London based published working in the early to mid 19th century. They are best known for their publication of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge's ground breaking subscription atlas. They also published John Thomson's magnificent New General Atlas from 1814 - c. 1820. In addition to their cartographic corpus, the firm had wide ranging publishing interests in many other areas, including books, broadsides, and an investment in Blackwood's Magazine. They had their offices at 47 Paternoster Row, London, England.
    NZ$ 155.00
  • Australian Antique Nautical Chart - 1865
    This is a large 96cm x 69 cm Chart titled "TACKING POINT TO COFFS ISLANDS". Some small faults but in Very Good Condition as per our pictures. This is SHEET VI published by The Admiralty Hydrographic Office in London Dated 12th October 1865. The Superintendence was by Captain G.H. Richards R.N. HYDROGRAPHER. The chart was drawn for engraving by P.L. Hemming of the Hydrographic Office and was Engraved by J & C Walker. The Survey was done by Com. Fredrick . W. Sidney R.N. IN 1862 with Outer Soundings completed by Navy Lieut. J.T. Gowland R.N. in 1869. Originally sold by J.D. Potter, London, as Agent for The Hydrographic Office. for the Sum of 2 shillings & Sixpence. We have five similar Nautical Charts of the Australian East Coast available...these were all owned by Ships Master Victor Stuart....a copy of his Masters Certificate is shown in our pictures. Captain G.H. Richards was born in Antony, Cornwall, the son of Captain G. S. Richards, and joined the Royal Navy in 1832. He served in South America, the Falkland Islands, New Zealand, Australia and in the First Opium War in China. Promoted to captain in 1854, from 1857 to 1864 he was in command of the two survey ships: HMS Plumper and HMS Hecate. He was the second British commissioner to the San Juan Islands Boundary Commission and a hydrographer on the coast of British Columbia in 1857–1862. He is responsible for the selection and designation of dozens of placenames along the British Columbia coast. In the Vancouver area, for example, he named False Creek. In 1859, after his engineer Francis Brockton found a vein of coal, he named Brockton Point and the area of Coal Harbour. In 1860, he named Mount Garibaldi after Giuseppe Garibaldi. Other landmarks in the area named by him are the Britannia Range, and Brunswick Mountain and many features in the Howe Sound, Sunshine Coast, and Jervis Inlet areas. In 1864 he was appointed hydrographer and held that position until 1874 when he retired. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in June 1866. He was knighted in 1877, became a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath in 1881 and became an admiral in 1884. He died in Bath, Somerset aged 76. A portrait of him by Stephen Pearce, dated 1865, hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in London. Mount Richards in Waterton Lakes National Park in Alberta, Canada is named in his honor.
    NZ$ 250.00

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